Food Science Advocate

Be a Food Science Advocate

One food scientist can make a difference. To help you take the first step, we have developed some simple ways you can raise awareness and the value of food science.

Food Facts
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Tons of shareable, consumer focused content about nutrition, food safety, emerging technologies, and other food related issues.
Toolkit Advocacy
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Helpful science-backed resources providing information to help dispel common misconceptions around important food-related topics.
Food Science Matters
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Real-life, sharable examples of how important food science is to ensuring our global food system is safe, nutritious, and sustainable.
Career in Food Science
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Great resources exemplifying the exciting options and opportunities a career in food science and innovation available to students interested in science.

Using Social Media to Amplify Sound Food Science

You can help spread the word about food science via social media. These guidelines will help you navigate each of the social media channels to spread the word. Before you start, please be sure to check your company’s social media policy.

  • Twitter: Be sure to include hashtags (#) with keywords so that they will show up in searches. Examples include: #FoodScience, #foodprocessing, #nutrition, #foodsafety. Use the @ sign for your tweet to show up in specific Twitter feeds like @IFT.
  • Facebook: Posting or sharing posts about food science on Facebook is a great way to get the word out to your friends and family. You can recommend IFT’s website or share a video link. Find IFT on Facebook and don’t forget to “like” us.
  • YouTube: Watch a video on IFT’s YouTube Channel and share it with others, or you can make your own video about food science and post it.
  • LinkedIn: Update your LinkedIn profile with a note about food science.

Get Involved in Your Community

By spending a few hours in your community, you can make a difference by educating people on food issues or by ensuring those individuals have enough to eat. Volunteering for food related causes is a great way to meet others interested in food sustainability, safety, and nutrition who may not have a full understanding of the positive impact food science can have. It’s also a great opportunity to introduce food science as a viable career choice to younger audiences.

Become a Resource on Food Issues by Sending an Email

Within your organization, there may be several colleagues who make not be aware of the valuable resources available to them. You can raise awareness and to help sell the story of food science and technology by reaching out to colleagues in your corporate communications, marketing, public relations office, or government relations team.

In the email, take a few minutes to introduce yourself and share a few resources that may be valuable to your colleagues. You can use the following template email to raise awareness of IFT resources that can help your organization’s communications professionals respond to consumers, media, local community groups, or government officials.

Dear [Colleague]:

Since you often get requests from the public and the media, I would like to share resources that may be useful to you. The Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) has developed tools to help spread the word about the important contributions food science makes in providing the world with an abundant food supply. I would like to call your attention to these tools compiled on IFT’s website and hope they can be of use to you as a communications professional.

  • IFT Food Facts – ift.org/foodfacts
    This web site is full of consumer information and videos about food science to help consumers learn about nutrition, food safety, and other food related issues.
  • IFT Toolkits – ift.org/toolkits
    Helpful, online science-backed resources providing information to help dispel common misconceptions around important food-related topics designed to be shareable as a thoughtful tools in promoting knowledge.
  • Why Food Science Matters – ift.org/foodsciencematters
    A webpage chock full of real-life, sharabLE examples of how important food science is to ensuring our global food system is safe, nutritious, and sustainable.
  • Careers in Food Science – ift.org/foodsciencecareers
    A webpage full of great resources exemplifying the exciting options and opportunities a career in food science and innovation can bring.  Resources include different job opportunities, salary ranges, and   “Day In the Life” videos. These videos feature food scientists at NASA and Disney and show why they enjoy their work. The videos can be used as recruitment tools to encourage young professionals to join the food science profession. Educational resources for students are also available on the Become a Food Scientist web page. 

I hope you will be able to use these tools to help raise awareness about the importance of food science to ensuring our global food supply is safe, nutritious, and sustainable.

For more information, go to ift.org or call +1.312.782.8424.

Sincerely,
[Your Name]

Dear [Family or Friend]:

The Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) has developed tools to help spread the word about the important contributions food science makes in providing the world with an abundant, safe, and nutritious food supply. I hope you find the information on IFT’s web site interesting and share it with others.

  •  IFT Food Facts – ift.org/foodfacts
    This web site is full of information and videos about food science to help consumers learn about nutrition, food safety, emerging tchnoloies, and other food related issues.
  • IFT Toolkits – ift.org/toolkits  
    Helpful, science-backed resources providing factual information about commonly misunderstood food-related topics.
  • Why Food Science Matters – ift.org/foodsciencematters
    Real-life examples of how important food science is to ensuring our global food system is safe, nutritious, and sustainable

I hope these tools are helpful to gaining a better understanding of how important and essential food science is to ensuring our food is safe, nutritious, delicious, and sustainable. Please let me know if you have any questions. I’m happy to be a resource.

Many thanks,
[Your Name]

Dear [Reporter]:

I recently [read or viewed] a news story that discussed [add topic of news story], and I wanted to reach out to you to make an introduction.  Your story on [topic] raised important perspectives, and I wanted to share a scientific perspective since I have a background as [add your expertise].  

Your article covered important issues on [add positive aspects of the media story]. However, I noted that your story did not include information on [add information that you feel was missing or incorrect].  Also, I wanted to share background from the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) about the important contributions of food science.  At ift.org/foodsciencematters, you’ll find information and several videos providing examples of how food science plays an essential role in ensuring our global food supply is safe, nutritious, and sustainable. You may also be interested in other free resources on ift.org.  Another resource is called Food Facts at ift.org/foodfacts .This web site is full of information and videos about food science and its positive impact on nutrition, food safety and  quality. 

I hope you will be able to use these resources to help increase understanding on food issues, and I would be happy to answer any questions if you plan to do any stories in the future. 

Sincerely, [Your Name and Contact Information]

Reaching out to your elected officials is another great way to share the positive impact food science has.
To find the phone number of senators and representatives, you may search free government websites at www.house.gov and www.senate.gov, or you can call the U.S. Capitol Switchboard at (202) 224-3121 and ask the operator for contact information for your elected official.

Remember that telephone calls are usually taken by a staff member, not the member of Congress.

  1. Ask to speak with the aide who handles the issue about which you wish to comment.
  2. After identifying yourself, tell the aide you would like to leave a brief message, such as: "Please tell Senator/Representative (Name) that I support/oppose (S.___/H.R.___)."
  3. Clearly state reasons for your support or opposition to the bill. Avoid using technical jargon and acronyms, or if they must be used, define them.
  4. Ask for your senators' or representative's position on the bill.
  5. Leave your contact information and offer to provide further information if it would be helpful.

NOTE: You may also request a written response to your telephone call.

E-mail is the most popular choice of communication with a congressional office. If you decide to write an e-mail, this list of helpful suggestions will improve the effectiveness of your correspondence:

  1. Your purpose for writing should be stated clearly in the first paragraph of the e-mail. If your e-mail pertains to a specific piece of legislation, identify it accordingly, e.g., House bill: H. R. ____, Senate bill: S.____.
  2. Be courteous, to the point, and include key information, using examples to support your position. Often the best examples include why this is important to you, your work, your institution, your state.
  3. Avoid using technical jargon and acronyms, or if they must be used, define them. 
  4. Address only one issue in each e-mail; and, if possible, keep the e-mail to four succinct paragraphs.
  5. Provide your contact information in the e-mail and offer to provide further information if it would be helpful.

NOTE: You may also request a response to your e-mail.

Generally, the same guidelines apply as with writing e-mails to Congress. You may find a mailing address for your senators and representative directly at www.house.gov and www.senate.gov. However, please note that there is a considerable lag time between when you send the letter and when it is ultimately received in a House or Senate office.  Therefore, you may want to opt for phone calls or e-mails.

ADDRESSING CORRESPONDENCE:

To a Senator:
The Honorable (full name)
__(Rm.#)__(name of)Senate Office Building
United States Senate
Washington, DC 20510

Dear Senator:

To a Representative:
The Honorable (full name)
__(Rm.#)__(name of)House Office Building
United States House of Representatives
Washington, DC 20515

Dear Representative:

Note: When writing to the Chair of a Committee or the Speaker of the House, it is proper to address them as:

Dear Mr. Chairman or Madam Chairwoman:
Dear Madam Speaker or Mr. Speaker:

Spread the Word

Help Spread the Word

IFT Members, apply to be an IFT Food Science Advocate. Join a passionate group of science of food professionals working together to spread the word about the importance of food science through social media, email, and in-person interactions.

Apply today

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