IFTNEXT Startup Alley

IFTNEXT Startup Alley

IFTNEXT Startup Alley promotes innovation within the science of food by providing food startups with exceptional exposure to potential customers and VCs.

Each year at IFT’s Annual Event and Food Expo, IFT’s IFTNEXT Startup Alley offers startups the opportunity to showcase their innovations and connect with influential major food company contacts, VCs, and industry leaders looking to discover the future of food today.

For Startups

Startup Alley offers you a discounted rate to exhibit at one of the largest North American food ingredient and innovation trade shows. The premium location of Startup Alley gives you maximum exposure to the industry professionals who can take your company to the next level.

For Industry Professionals

Discover the next innovation in food. Visit Startup Alley to discover what’s happening on the cutting edge of the science of food and food innovation.

Who Can Participate

Startup Alley is open to startups that have been founded within the past five years. The companies must either be offering a novel solution, innovative product, or they must be disrupting an existing product category using science and innovation.

See complete participating exhibitor criteria.

Kickstart the growth of your startup

Find out how you can showcase your innovations and connect with influential major food company contacts, VCs, and industry leaders.

Learn more

Latest From IFTNEXT right arrow

Learning about human appetites from the common fruit fly

Insights into the diets of the tiny common fruit fly may help provide understandings into how humans evolved to eat what we eat, according to new research published in Cell Reports and a press release from Kyoto University.

Identifying the genes that control plant traits

An international team of scientists led by the University of Goettingen has developed a new approach to identifying the genes that control plant traits.

Students engineer honey using bacterium, not bees

A team of 12 students from the Department of Biotechnology and Food Engineering at the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology has won a gold medal at the International Genetically Engineered Machine (iGEM) competition in Boston for its bee-free honey.

Growing crops in high-salinity soil

Earth’s soil is becoming more saline, and as it does, growing crops becomes more difficult or impossible. Scientists at Brigham Young University (BYU) may have discovered a way to prevent soil salinity from ruining crops and crop yields.

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