IFTNEXT Newsletter

IFTNext Newsletter

Inspiring Innovation to Feed the Future and Beyond 

Researched and written weekly by the editorial team of Food Technology magazine, the IFTNEXT Newsletter explores what are, arguably, the next big things in the science of food through original reporting of scientific breakthroughs, leading-edge technology, novel food components, and transdisciplinary R&D.

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For the of week December 2, 2019

broccoli

Broccoli compound may promote kidney health for some

Research with a mouse model coupled with an analysis of human clinical trial data have suggested that bioactive compound(s) in broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables may reduce the progression of kidney disease in mice and humans with a specific genetic makeup.
December 1, 2019
broccoli

Broccoli compound may promote kidney health for some

Research with a mouse model coupled with an analysis of human clinical trial data have suggested that bioactive compound(s) in broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables may reduce the progression of kidney disease in mice and humans with a specific genetic makeup.
December 1, 2019
alfalfa

Growing crops in high-salinity soil

Earth’s soil is becoming more saline, and as it does, growing crops becomes more difficult or impossible. Scientists at Brigham Young University (BYU) may have discovered a way to prevent soil salinity from ruining crops and crop yields.
December 2, 2019
First author, Abiskar Gyawali, measuring the heights of plants in the field

Identifying the genes that control plant traits

An international team of scientists led by the University of Goettingen has developed a new approach to identifying the genes that control plant traits.
December 3, 2019
honey

Students engineer honey using bacterium, not bees

A team of 12 students from the Department of Biotechnology and Food Engineering at the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology has won a gold medal at the International Genetically Engineered Machine (iGEM) competition in Boston for its bee-free honey.
December 2, 2019
fruit flies on a lemon slice

Learning about human appetites from the common fruit fly

Insights into the diets of the tiny common fruit fly may help provide understandings into how humans evolved to eat what we eat, according to new research published in Cell Reports and a press release from Kyoto University.
December 3, 2019
honey

Students engineer honey using bacterium, not bees

A team of 12 students from the Department of Biotechnology and Food Engineering at the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology has won a gold medal at the International Genetically Engineered Machine (iGEM) competition in Boston for its bee-free honey.
December 2, 2019
fruit flies on a lemon slice

Learning about human appetites from the common fruit fly

Insights into the diets of the tiny common fruit fly may help provide understandings into how humans evolved to eat what we eat, according to new research published in Cell Reports and a press release from Kyoto University.
December 3, 2019
alfalfa

Growing crops in high-salinity soil

Earth’s soil is becoming more saline, and as it does, growing crops becomes more difficult or impossible. Scientists at Brigham Young University (BYU) may have discovered a way to prevent soil salinity from ruining crops and crop yields.
December 2, 2019
First author, Abiskar Gyawali, measuring the heights of plants in the field

Identifying the genes that control plant traits

An international team of scientists led by the University of Goettingen has developed a new approach to identifying the genes that control plant traits.
December 3, 2019

More from IFTNEXT

Technology extends the shelf life of apples

Researchers from the Institute of Environmental Biotechnology at TU Graz in cooperation with the Austrian Centre of Industrial Biotechnology and industrial partners have successfully tested ecological methods (i.e., hot water treatment [HWT] and biocontrol organisms) that improve the storage of apples and extend their shelf life.

Iron intake may diminish health impact of lycopene

If lycopene is consumed along with iron-rich products, it’s less likely that the anti-cancer benefits will be realized, according to research from scientists at The Ohio State University and two French institutions.

Genetic basis for probiotic activity

A newly discovered specific trait of the yeast Saccharomyces boulardii may help give the yeast strong probiotic properties.

Agricultural technique combats passion fruit disease

According to a recent study, researchers in Brazil have determined that a simple technique may prevent the disease passion fruit woodiness from spreading among Brazil’s passion flower crops.

Foods fried in vegetable oil may exacerbate colon disorders

Scientists at the University of Massachusetts–Amherst (UMass-Amherst) recently completed a study on the effects of foods fried in vegetable oil in animal models.

Humanizing food may help reduce food waste

Researchers are working to find ways to reduce the staggering amounts of wasted food, and one of the latest studies on the topic suggests that thinking of fresh produce in terms of human traits may help.